Content © MMXVIII T A Bird

Latin programs

My suite of over 35 Latin programs was originally written for the BBC Model B computer. These programs were used in many UK schools and were sent to many other countries, including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the United States of America. They were given classroom use for many years in Colchester Royal Grammar School in Colchester, Essex, where I was Head of Classics, and I have now rewritten them for Windows and considerably extended them. They are very flexible, need little or no introduction and are instantly available to the student from a desktop icon. They are perhaps most successful when used by the individual student out of the classroom. Despite the modern format, we believe in ruthless but rational grammar and vocabulary practice. There are two sets, one for GCSE and one for AS level, the difference being the vocabulary tested. The vocabulary programs, arranged by parts of speech, use the OCR Defined Vocabulary Lists. They constitute an excellent aid in acquiring vocabulary systematically. They consist of a multiple choice test of meanings followed by a test requiring the correct Latin word to be typed in, a rigorous and efficient test. These are aimed at GCSE sets (who have done three or four years of Latin) or AS sets (after five or six years) according to the vocabulary.   Another set of programs tests the endings of the seven main Latin noun types, asking for cases and offering excellent reinforcement. They give clear help by pages of grammatical information. These could be used at various stages. For the confident, another program tests all noun endings. Further programs test verbs, allowing the selection of tenses to be included in the test, in any combination, and then the choice of working from English to Latin or from Latin to English. The easy choice of tenses makes it possible to work out from a low demand (say present active) to high demand (all tenses active and passive). Where appropriate several translations are available for tenses (eg the present). One test deals with the four conjugations, active and passive, another with deponent verbs, another with the irregular verbs sum, possum, eo, volo, nolo. Finally there are similar subjunctive, infinitive and principal part tests. Support for the programs is readily available should it be needed, but installation is simple and the programs are very easy to use. Try our samples here.
Programs
Classics content © MMXVIII T A Bird
Terry Bird Classics

Latin programs

My suite of over 35 Latin programs was originally written for the BBC Model B computer. These programs were used in many UK schools and were sent to many other countries, including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the United States of America. They were given classroom use for many years in Colchester Royal Grammar School in Colchester, Essex, where I was Head of Classics, and I have now rewritten them for Windows and considerably extended them. They are very flexible, need little or no introduction and are instantly available to the student from a desktop icon. They are perhaps most successful when used by the individual student out of the classroom. Despite the modern format, we believe in ruthless but rational grammar and vocabulary practice. There are two sets, one for GCSE and one for AS level, the difference being the vocabulary tested. The vocabulary programs, arranged by parts of speech, use the OCR Defined Vocabulary Lists. They constitute an excellent aid in acquiring vocabulary systematically. They consist of a multiple choice test of meanings followed by a test requiring the correct Latin word to be typed in, a rigorous and efficient test. These are aimed at GCSE sets (who have done three or four years of Latin) or AS sets (after five or six years) according to the vocabulary.   Another set of programs tests the endings of the seven main Latin noun types, asking for cases and offering excellent reinforcement. They give clear help by pages of grammatical information. These could be used at various stages. For the confident, another program tests all noun endings. Further programs test verbs, allowing the selection of tenses to be included in the test, in any combination, and then the choice of working from English to Latin or from Latin to English. The easy choice of tenses makes it possible to work out from a low demand (say present active) to high demand (all tenses active and passive). Where appropriate several translations are available for tenses (eg the present). One test deals with the four conjugations, active and passive, another with deponent verbs, another with the irregular verbs sum, possum, eo, volo, nolo. Finally there are similar subjunctive, infinitive and principal part tests. Support for the programs is readily available should it be needed, but installation is simple and the programs are very easy to use. Try our samples here.